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Here are even more great images taken with Trifid cameras. You can see the list is long, but we are always looking to add more images. Please send us your best images for inclusion here.


PK104 by Ken Crawford

This has to be the faintest image we have every posted on this website. PK104 has so little to show that you may have to look twice to even see it. Other images of it on the web are grainy and show little contrast. What Ken Crawford has done is pull out more depth, color and detail than any of the other images of PK104 I could find. Even still, he did not overstretch the image as you can see from his nice star colors. Click on the image to the right to see just how much data there is in this image of a very faint object.

Pickerings Triangle by Bob Fera

Located in the Veil Nebula in Cygnus, Pickering's Triangle is often imaged as a rather faint but distinct triangle. What Bob Fera shows us is how rich and full this area really is. So much so, you can hardly make out the triangle, but nobody cares because he brings out details you cannot find elsewhere. I really enjoy the faint wisps of blue oxygen which veil the bright red hydrogen-alpha. Click on the image to the right to get the full experience.

NGC4568 by Ken 
Crawford

Have you ever seen these colliding twin galaxies? They are called NGC4567 and NGC4568, and they are stunning. Especially when they are imaged and processed by a craftsman like Ken Crawford. No less than Rob Gendler said it was the finest image of the twins he had ever seen an amateur produce. Note the differences in color of the two cores and all of the background galaxies that seem to be crowding in to get a good look at the coming conflict. Life inside of warring galaxies must be crazy. Click on the image to the right to view all of the festivities.

IC5146 by Bob Fera

This image of IC5146 gives the appearance of a star wrapped in cotton. You would expect it to feel soft if you were to reach out and touch it. What Bob Fera has captured in this image of the Cocoon Nebula is the many layers of dust that wrap around the central star and give it that soft look. Like other objects Bob has photographed, this is both a reflection and an emission nebula, which you are going to have to click on to see in a size where you can really appreciate it.

The Helix by Jason Ware

In this mapped color image Jason Ware is once again showing us how much can be done near a brightly lighted city if you are using AstroDon narrowband filters, a 12-inch, Meade RCX-400 and a Trifid-2 camera. The Helix Nebula is thought to be a bubble of expanding gas, with the center of the bubble pointed right at us. Whatever the shape, Jason captured what looks like an eye in the sky that is keeping watch over us. Click on the image to the right to see the full size version.

IC342 by Ken Crawford

I want to call this image "marshmallows in chocolate syrup." IC342 is actually a close neighbor that in many ways is like the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy, but it has very low surface brightness. How much of its dimness is due to the dust we look through in the Milky Way to see it and how much of it is intrinsic is much debated among astronomers. Click on the image to the right to see what a wonderful job Ken Crawford has done of putting together an image of a galaxy that can be described as only murky on a good day.

The Veil Nebula by Jason Ware

This image of the Veil Nebula through AstroDon narrowband filters, mapped to red, white and blue, is Jason Ware's tribute to the people who fight to keep the United States safe and in remembrance of the people who died in the attacks of September 11th, 2001. "Never forget" is what Jason said when he posted this image, taken with his 12-inch, Meade RCX-400 telescope. Click on the image to the right to see the full size image.

NGC-7000 by Ken Crawford

There are certain images which you look at and say "Wow, I had no idea that so much was possible with that object." This image of the Cave Nebula, NGC-70000 by Ken Crawford is just such an image. It will help you understand what he has accomplished if you will browse the web first and become aware of what others have done with this area of the sky. Then click on the image to the right to see what structure is visible when Ken mapped Hydrogen-alpha to red, Oxygen-III to blue and Sulfur-II to green. Then click on this link to see what Ken did by mapping Sulfur-II to red, Hydrogen-alpha to green and Oxygen-III to blue. Considering the range Ken is covering with his AP-130 telescope, people may be telling him to sell his RC-20 telescope and just concentrate on the small one. Thanks Ken, for once again helping us to see what is possible.

M16 by Jason Ware

It is pretty amazing what you can do with AstroDon narrowband filters and a Meade RCX-400 telescope, even from the bright skies around Dallas. Jason Ware braved the wind to bring us this unusual mapped image of M16. Click on the image to the right and see how much of the Eagle Nebula you can see.

KC97c by Ken Crawford

You will not find too many images of KC97c on the Internet. This small emission nebula in Orion is difficult to image under the best circumstances, but Ken Crawford shows us how much he can do with his RC-20 telescope and our Trifid-2 camera. I really like the bright blue stars next to the red glowing nebula and the dark, sharp-edge dust clouds. There is a lot to look at here, which you will see if you click on the image to the right.

M27 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware obviously enjoys making astronomical images in an unusual light. Some would say this image of M27 is unnatural; others call it mapped color and do not worry about it. Whatever your preferences you have to admit this is a unique image of the Dumbbell Nebula. Click on the image to the right to see it in full size.

M-13 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford is hard at work showing us just how much can be done with an AP-130 telescope, AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 camera. It is such a pleasure to view the images Ken makes, whether he is focusing the light with an RC-20 or an AP-130 all of the elements: composition, color, noise, image processing—are right on. This image is no exception. As usual, you see many fait background galaxies, but the core of M13 is not blown out in an attempt to bring out details that really are not there. Click on the image to the right and see what I mean when I say that we are really proud to have Ken's images on our website.

M-16 by Bob Fera

The Eagle Nebula is one object that astronomers return to again and again—and for good reason. Emission nebula are often bright objects, which illuminate all of the complex structure within the nebula. The so-called "Pillars of Creation" in the center of the frame were made famous by the Hubble Space Telescope image of the same. Everyone likes to image this object because there is so much detail to see. Click on the image to the right and see everything Bob Fera has brought to this image.

NGC-7000 by Greg Beeke

Many of you may know Greg Beeke from his work making astro-images with webcams. We are very happy that he now has a Trifid-2 6303-based camera and is still showing us how to push the envelop of his art. Here is an image of the North American Nebula, NGC-7000, taken by Greg and proudly displayed on our website. Click on the image to the right to see all of the fine detail Greg has captured in this image. He will have to tell you how long it would have taken to make the same image with a webcam: too long to be worth doing, I suspect.

M-17 by Bob Fera

There are people out there who think you can only take great astro-photos from New Mexico using a very large telescope. With this image of the Swan Nebula, Bob Fera shows us what can be done from near Sacramento, California, with a 12-1/2 inch RC telescope, AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 6303-based camera. You are going to have to click on the image to the right and see the full sized image to really appreciate what Bob has done in relatively little time. As always, when you see the large image, you can always tell it is a "Fera" by his marvelous image processing.

M61 by Ken Crawford

You do not see too many images of M61, because it is low in the sky and it is small. But Ken Crawford shows us why we would like to see lots more images of this galaxy. This image is the combination of 3-1/2 hours of data, which is very short by today's standards. Still there is a lot of richness in this image and it has considerable depth. Click on the image to the right to see how many faint background galaxies you can count and to appreciate how much detail there is in the core of M61.

A2151 by Ken Crawford

This image is the answer to the question: what can Ken Crawford of the Ken Crawford do with 180 minutes of luminance and 74 minutes x 3 colors through AstroDon filters, a 20-inch RC telescope and a Trifid-2 6303 Camera. The answer is: create eye-candy that is pure pleasure to look at. This is one of those images you really don't even know until you click on it and see the full sized image. The A2151 galaxy cluster is also known as the Abell Cluster, and in full color it is a beauty. I do not know about you, but I got tired of counting galaxies when I reached 100.

Gamma Cyg by Greg Beeke

Images of Gamma Cyg always intrigue me because none of them look exactly the same. They obviously share a great many of the same features, but each photographer seems to be able to draw out ever unique subtleties that show their own interest in the object. Greg Beeke has not disappointed me by once again casting a unique face on this object and I really like that you can make out the Crescent Nebula in the field of view. It is a nice job of framing the subject. Click on the image to the right to see the full sized version.

Caldwell-9 by Ken Crawford

This image is yet further proof that taking great images does not require a large telescope. Ken Crawford took this image of the Cave Nebula, also known as Caldwell-9 and Sharpless 2-155, with an AP-130, five inch telescope. While Ken does not think this is one of his best images, what does separate it from many others is the large field of view which show not only the darkened cave but the rich star field in which it lives. Click on the image to the right for the full sized image.

NGC891 by Jason Ware

While Jason Ware was busy playing hockey, his 12-inch RCX-400 telescope and Trifid-2 6303 camera were busy taking this image of NGC 891. Click on the image to the right and decide for yourself if we should call this Jason's image or the image of a nice telescope and camera that happen to be owned by him.

M106 by Ken Crawford

You have to compare this image to some seriously long exposures to see all of the detail visible in the faint arms of M106 by Ken Crawford. Ken has been getting high praise from all over the Internet for this image, especially the red jets that can be seen just to the right of the core, pointing down. Click on the image and keep looking; there is a lot of detail to see.

NGC6946 by Bob Fera

Bob Fera said everything that could go wrong did go wrong while taking this image, but the end results are pretty impressive all the same. Using his 12.5-inch Parallax telescope, AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 6303 camera, this image of NGC6946 shows wispy blue extended object that I never knew was there. His star colors are mostly yellow and red, so you know he didn't push the blue during image processing, just reached deep into the night sky to bring us another fine image. You will have to click on the image and see the high resolution version to really appreciate what he has done.

M65 by Jason

Jason Ware called the 2005 Texas Star Party a wash-out due to the bad weather. But he must have found a brief opening in the clouds because he sent us this wonderful image of M65 he took with his Meade 12-inch RCX, Optec filter wheel and his new Trifid-2 KAF-6303E camera with a class-2 imaging chip. He says the seeing was marginal at best and he lost the guide star a few times. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

M100 by Bob Fera

When I look at this image of M100 or any image done by Bob Fera, all I can say is "Wow; that is what I want to be when I grow up!" Unfortunately, I am already grown up. But in his soft-spoken way, Bob tells me it is not too late—that anyone can learn to process images as he does. All I can say to that is I don't think Bob knows how much some of us struggle to produce acceptable images—that it takes a master to do what he has done. It is not too surprising that Bob says this image really isn't good enough to blow up by his standards, but if you click on the image to the right I still think you will see why I am so happy he is taking these images with a Trifid-2 camera. Just look at all of the background galaxies! The sensitivity of the camera really shows in this wonderfully processed image.

NGC5908 by Ken Crawford

NGC5908 is a small and unusual looking galaxy, but I don't think you can be surprised too much by it because it is Galaxy Season, which means it is open season for Ken Crawford and his Trifid-2 KAF-6303E based camera. Ken has captured this edge-on spiral galaxy in great detail. I like the rays of light that seem to emanate from the top and the bottom of the galaxy. Click on the image to the right to see all of the details including the many background galaxies.

NGC6015 by Ken Crawford

I know that processing color data is a difficult and demanding task. But when I see an image like this one of NGC6015 by Ken Crawford I think, Wow! what a great result a Trifid-2 camera can deliver in the hands of an expert. The blues and the reds seem to literally pop out of this galaxy and the outer halo is simply amazing. How does Ken do it? Whatever his secret is, we all hope he keeps delivering a lot more fine images such as this one. Click on the image to the right to see what I mean.

NGC6503 by Ken 
Crawford

This little galaxy—NGC6503—is one I had not seen before, but it is a beauty. When Ken Crawford takes and processes images you know they are going to be something special, but this one really takes your breath away. Just look at all of the beautiful blue and red details in the core of the galaxy, which contrast so well with the yellow giant star off to the side. Click on the image to the right to really enjoy just how nice this image is. As you zoom in you will just keep finding more and more details to feast on.

NGC5921 by Ken 
Crawford

Ken Crawford tells us that he struggled to put this color image of NGC5921 together because the seeing was only moderate at 2.5 arc-seconds. That tells you a little about how hard Ken works to make fantastic images, because many of us would be very happy with 2.5 arc-second seeing for an entire image of multiple colors. Ken's hard work has once again paid off and we have another beautiful little galaxy to enjoy. But don't just take my word for it, click on the image to the right to see the full sized image. You will be glad that you did.

NGC5248 by Ken Crawford

When Ken Crawford first looked at his image of NGC5248, he thought he had done something wrong--or maybe that his camera was broken. He had not seen a spiral galaxy with such brown arms and a blue core before. But he did some research and discovered that astronomers are studying this galaxy with the Hubble Space Telescope because they suspect that new star formation is driving its strange appearance. Good thing for us that he found this, because we would not have been able to "fix" his camera if he sent back to us. Click on the image to the right to see a close-up of this beautiful and usual galaxy.

NGC6543 by Ken Crawford

There is only one thing you can say about this image of NGC6543: sunglass alert! Ken Crawford really pulled the stops out with his Trifid-2 6303-based camera and AstroDon narrowband filters. What this image has that no other I have seen—or Rob Gendler to hear him talk—is a delicate blend of the inner and outer regions of this nebula. You see some images have the internal details, but the outer halo is lost. Or the outer halo is well defined but the core is blown out. It takes someone of Ken's considerable processing talents to pull off a masterpiece that contains both. Click on the image to the right to really see what I mean.

IC443 by Bob Fera

It has been raining so much near Sacramento that the ducks are leaving, but Bob Fera was able to sneak in this image of IC443 taken with a Stellarvue SV152 6-inch f/8 APO refractor and a Trifid-2 6303 camera. In this nicely framed image, Bob was able to give a real three dimensional look to the nebula and to deal with the very bright star just off to the side. You are going to have to click on the image to see all of the nice detail in this image.

NGC7640 by Ken Crawford

When Ken Crawford goes hunting galaxies with his trusty AstroDon filters and Trifid-2 6303 camera, you never know exactly what he will bring home, but you know it will be unusual and exciting. This image of NGC7640—which shows an almost edge-on view of a barred spiral galaxy—is no exception. The bright blue stars in the foreground may trick you into thinking that Ken has colored the galaxy a bit too violet, but look at the rich gold and browns also visible in the galaxy and you will realize that Ken's colors are spot on. Click on the image to see the full size version and really appreciate everything Ken is showing us.

NGC2174 by Bob Fera

Bob Fera continues to show us what nice images he can take with a Sellarvue six-inch refractor, AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 6303 based camera in less time. With a sensitive camera and narrowband filters you can still image even when the full moon is high in the sky. What started out as a narrowband only image is now a full color beauty. Click on the image to see all of the rich details Bob was able to capture.

NGC6962 by Ken Crawford

When you look at images like this there is no question why Ken Crawford is called "Mr. Galaxy" by his friends and admirers. NGC6962 is beautiful, but difficult to image because it is so faint. Ken had to push his color data hard to bring out the color you do see, but you can tell from his dark background and the star colors that we are seeing a good honest rendition of blue and brown and gold in the galaxy. Ken tells that without AstroDon filters this image would have been nearly impossible with the amount of imaging time he has in it. If you click on the image for the full size version you will find many additional galaxies that surround the main galaxy. Do galaxies always come in groups? They seem to in Ken's images—maybe just because his images are always so deep.

VdB93 and IC2177 by Bob Fera

The Seagull's Nose may be a funny name for an emission nebula, but Bob Fera shows more of vdB93 and IC 2177 in Canis Major and in less time than if he was not using a Trifid-2 6303E based camera. Paired with his AstroDon filters, a Stellarvue SV152 six-inch refractor and Bob's unique processing abilities, You can see all sorts of detail and fine gradations that you would otherwise miss.

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NGC7331 by Ken Crawford

I have to admit straight out that galaxies are my favorite astronomical subject, so you cannot be too surprised when I like this image of NGC7331 by Ken Crawford. But this is a "Wow!" that really deserves a "Wow!" If you don't trust me, just click on the image, pull in the full sized version, study the intimate details of the central galaxy and then start browsing around for additional galaxies. In the small image you can see six or seven galaxies; in the large version you will see tens of them. This is an image well worth studying in some detail.

M51 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford is back again with this amazing image of M51 taken with his Trifid-2 KAF-6303E camera, AstroDon filters and his 20-inch RC Optical telescope. With only 208 minutes of luminance and 64 minutes of color per filter you can see details and galaxies I have never seen before. It makes me sorry I called his last image "spectacular" because I don't like to repeat myself. Click on the image to see the full-sized version or click here to see just the luminance image.

NGC7023 by Bob Fera

The Foothill Gang in the Sacramento, California, area continues to show us that you do not need to live in the New Mexico deserts with a one meter telescope to take great photos. Bob Fera, using his 12.5-inch Parallax telescope, AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 6303 camera took this image of NGC7023 in Cepheus—what is known as the Iris Nebula. What is great about this photo is how tight the central star is and how much you can see through the dust, but you are going to have to click on the image to see all of those details.

M42 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware continues to put his AstroDon narrowband filters, Meade RCX-400 and Trifid-2 camera to good use, as you can see in this image of M42. We have several other M42 images available, but this narrowband version shows detail that the others miss—and Jason took this near Dallas during the nearly full moon. Click on the image to see it in large format.

NGC281 by Ken Crawford

Astronomy Picture of the Day (aka APOD) has a nice image of NGC281, but using a Trifid-2 6303 camera and AstroDon narrowband Ha, S-III and O-II filters, Ken Crawford shows us details you would expect from the Hubble Space Telescope. Though he may be sitting on terra firma, Ken's transparent image and dark Bok Globules make us glad he puts together these masterpieces for us to enjoy. To crawl up inside of this nebula you will have to click on the image and view the full size version.

NGC6995 by Bob Fera

In this many-hue image, Bob Fera takes us up close and personal with part of the Veil Nebula, NGC6995. The Veil is very large and very faint object in Cygnus: the remnant of a supernova explosion. Using AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 6303 camera, Bob shows us all sorts of details you may not be familiar with. My favorite part is the faint blue veil above the main veil, which you will only see if you click on the image and view the full size version.

M1 by Jason Ware

I know it is humid in Dallas, Texas, but Jason Ware tells me his 12-inch RCX-400 telescope and Trifid-2 6303-based camera have been sitting outside so long they are now infested with a crab. At least there is a Crab Nebula in the image if he points the telescope to just the right point in the sky. Click on the image to the right and see what this jokester has been up to. Extra color data in this image was provided with an AstroDon Hydrogen-alpha filter.

Medusa Nebula by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford found time to update his website and still bring us this AstroDon narrowband image of the Medusa Nebula. He shows all of the faint detail you can image even when the full moon is close at hand, if you have the right filters and a Trifid-2 camera. Ken said he is surprised by how much of the Nebula extends down off of the frame. Until he imaged it, he had no idea this nebula was so large. Click on the image to the right to see all of the faint wispies for yourself.

IC405 by Bob Fera

This is the first-light image by Bob Fera after his Trifid-2 6303-based camera received some upgrades. His camera has an engineering grade sensor, but Bob is obviously able to draw world-class images out of it. Bob took this image with a four-inch f/8 Williams Optic refractor—a little fishing line to give the stars a diffraction spike—and AstroDon LHaRGB filters. Click on the image to the right to see just how wonderful this image really is.

NGC6384 by Ken Crawford

Working under difficult conditions, Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory photographed NGC6384, a barrel galaxy in Ophiuchus. This is a faint target that visually appears near our own Milky Way, which makes it appear to live in a rich, colorful star field. Combining 119 minutes of unbinned luminance and 55 minutes of 2 x 2 binned RGB color, it is interesting to see how deep this image is when compared to others taken on similar equipment. Click on the image to see the full sized version.

Owl nebula by Jason Ware

This AstroDon narrowband image by Jason Ware shows the Owl Nebula in a light you have probably never seen before. Jason was able to zoom in on this target with his Meade RCX-400 telescope and Trifid-2 camera. Click on the image to the right to see the full size image.

IC1396A by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory pulled out all of the stops in his latest narrow-band image of IC1396A. Using AstroDon filters and our camera he captured hydrogen-alpha (Ha), oxygen-3 (OIII) and sulfur-2 (SII) emissions. Even with everything there is to see in this image Ken tells me it is a work in progress: after the moon wanes he is going to add standard LGRB color layers to it. If you click on the image you will download the large one MB file that is the full-sized version, but it is well worth it. Thanks, Ken, what an amazing image.

Crab nebula by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography is having even more fun with his new AstroDon narrowband filters. and a Trifid-2 6303 camera. In this image of the Crab Nebula he has 280 minutes of Ha, 80 minutes of SII and 80 minutes of OIII. As is the norm for him lately, he is imaging with a Meade 12-inch RCX 400 telescope which he guides with a Meade DSI and MaxIm/DL. Click on the image to see this electric rendition in full size and color.

Rosette Nebula by Jason Ware

With a brand new set of AstroDon narrowband filters he received for Christmas, Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography took this image of the dark clouds in the Rosette Nebula with his 12-inch RCX-400 telescope and a Trifid-2 6303-based camera. Jason credited Ken Crawford with helping him learn how to process narrowband data. Click on the image to the right to see just how nice of a job Jason did.

NGC2174 by Jason Ware

The fine weather Dallas, Texas, recently had is coming to an end with freezing rain in the forecast, but Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography slipped in this image of NGC 2174 with his 12-inch RCX-400 telescope and a Trifid-2 6303-based camera. Jason pulled in much of the red in this image with his red-sensitive camera and an AstroDon narrowband Hydrogen-alpha filter. Click on the image to the right to see just how nice it is on the big screen.

NGC281 by Jason Ware

Braving the full moon near Dallas, Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography brings us the third image of NGC281—the Pac Man Nebula—we have on our website, this time taken with a 12-inch RCX400, an AstroDon narrowband Ha filter, Optec RGB filters and a Trifid-2 6303 camera. Jason collected 120 minutes of the image with the Astrodon filter, which you can see here without the RGB data. Or click on the image to see the full size color version.

Color moon by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography is back with an image he took right at the moment of the full moon. This LRGB image is a mosaic of two images he took with his 12-inch Meade RCX400 and a Trifid-2 camera. If you haven't seen a stretched color image of the moon before the variations in color can be startling and they actually show geological differences in the moon. That makes this image scientific and beautiful all at the same time. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

M64 by Ken Crawford

Back from a short vacation, Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory added color to his luminance image of the Black Eye Galaxy, M64, and now it really is unbelievable. There are dark swirls and details you do not see in most images of M64. This was taken at F8.3 with his Trifid-2 KAF-6303E camera and AstroDon color filters in an Optec filter wheel. Click on the image to see the full-sized version or click here to see just the luminance image.

Flame Nebula by Jason Ware

Dodging the ice that took over his home near Dallas, Texas, Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography warmed up his 12-inch RCX-400 telescope, an AstroDon narrowband Hydrogen-alpha filter and a Trifid-2 6303-based camera with this image of the Flame Nebula. Though he exposed for five hours, I doubt the Flame kept him warm, but the cold did not hurt his image. Click on the image to the right to see the full size version.

Crescent Nebula by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory is back again showing what he can do with AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 camera. I have seen some really nice Crescent Nebulas (aka NGC6888), but never one that brings out all of the wisps of oxygen that wrap the hydrogen in a veil. The effect is spectacular. It takes a camera with a lot of sensitivity to pull in these sorts of details in a relatively short amount of time. You have to click on the image and see the full-sized version to really appreciate this image.

Helix Nebula by Jason Ware

It is fairly obvious that Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography is enjoying his RCX-400 telescope, his AstroDon narrowband Ha filter and his Trifid-2 6303 camera. Just look at all of the fine images he has taken with them lately. Others have taken notice of his work as well. Rob Gendler said this about Jason's 140 minute image of the Helix Nebula: "The outer nebulosity is most impressive." To get an up-close and personal view of the Helix and see for yourself, click on the image to the right.

IC5067 by Ken Crawford

This must be one of Ken Crawford's—of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory—favorite areas of the sky, because he went back and added narrow-band images to his collection of LRGB images. Combining the narrow-band and luminance images he created the image you see on the right. You can still view his hydrogen-alpha and LRGB image here and the 3-1/2 hours of hydrogen-alpha data here. You can see from these rich, smooth images how hard Ken pushes himself and how versatile his Trifid-2 camera is when used with AstroDon filters. Zoomed in this way you can see all of the faint structure and many details that Astronomers earn PhD's explaining. What I want to know is what is it that the elephant is holding in his trunk? It is too big to be a peanut; perhaps it is the ice cream cone of some now crying, interplanetary child. Click on the image to see the full sized version and make your own discoveries.

IC410 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory is just getting started with this image of IC410, but I wanted to show you what he has done so far with his Astrodon Hydrogen-alpha filter and Trifid-2 6303 camera. IC410 is often shot widefield, but Ken crawled up inside of it with 4,200 mm of focal length and produced what Rob Gendler called "Probably the most detailed view of this field I know of. Great work."

Ken has promised to fill in the details with Sulfur-II and Oxygen-III narrowband filters, which we will post as soon as it is available. Click on the image to see what a fine image he has already created.

M31 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography took this close-up of M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, with his Meade RCX400, an Optec filter wheel and a Trifid-2 camera. Situated just north of Dallas as he is, Jason says this is the limit of what he can do until he moves to darker skies. This image is a combination of 70 minutes of luminance, and 40 minutes each of red, green and blue. Click on the image to see the full size version. If you look close you might even find an asteroid in the lower right-hand portion of the image.

NGC7331 and Stephens Quintet AP130 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory went back to work shows us here what you can do with a short focal length telescope, a Trifid-2 camera and an AstroDon narrowband Ha filter. You could not take this image—which combines NGC7331 and Stephens Quintet—with a long focal length telescope unless you were going to take many images and stitch them together. The tight stars and the lack of diffraction spikes tell you it was taken with a fine refractor like the AP130 which Ken now owns. Along the way Ken captured a number of small galaxies that you will only see if you click on the image and view it in full size. Try to see how many galaxies you can find. If you stop counting at 20 you quit too soon.

Pillar by Jason Ware

While other parts of the country have been socked in with bad weather, Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography is flying high in Dallas. He took advantage of the great weather to bring us this image of the Pillar in the North American Nebula. Jason describes it as the Norhern Mexico part of the nebula, which he used a 12-inch RCX400, AstroDon filters and a Trifid-2 6303 camera to capture 120 minutes of exposures in total. Click on the image to see the full size version.

NGC281 AP130 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory revisited NGC281 with an AP130 telescope, his Trifid-2 camera and an AstroDon narrowband Ha filter, showing that he does not always have to use a long focal length telescope to take great images. The pinpoint stars and the lack of any diffraction spikes tells you this is a refractor. Considering how much shorter this telescope is, it is amazing how much detail you can find in the image. Click on this image and compare it with Ken's long focal length image of NGC281 and you will see that all of the Bok Globules are still there and the Hubblesque cloud formations are still visible.

NGC896 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography is busy at work taking images of NGC896 with his 12-inch Meade RCX-400 telescope, AstroDon filters and Trifid-2 6303 camera. Jason calls this "Pac-man's evil twin with jagged teeth." Click on the image to see the full size version and to see if you agree.

NGC7538 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory captured the caterpillar from "A Bug's Life" in NGC7538. Taken in hydrogen alpha, luminance, oxygen-III and RGB, here it is netted and mounted it for us all to see. Ken says there is an area of really strong oxygen-III around the yellow stars that make up the caterpillar's glowing eyes, showing that something intense is going on in there. Step on this bug with your mouse to see the full sized version.

The Skull by Jason Ware

Just in time for Halloween, Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography brings us an image of the Skull Nebula, taken with an RCX400, an Astrodon Ha filter and a Trifid-2 6303 camera. While you might not think this is very scary, you have to admit it is pretty cool. Click on the image to see the full size version.

SH2 188 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory must be a difficult man to please. Mere mortals would be quite happy with his new narrowband image of SH2 188 taken with AstroDon TruBalance filters and a Trifid-2 camera. But Ken tells me the monochrome-red look needs some additional star color added with normal RGB filters, which he will take as soon as the moon wanes. Never mind that his image is better than the Hydrogen Alpha image taken by the Issac Newton Telescope as shown in this study of the SH2 188, Ken is not finished with it and so you can expect to see an even better image here on our website in the near future.

California Nebula by Jason Ware

In his first light image with an AstroDon narrowband Ha filter, Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography pointed his f/8 RCX400 and his Trifid-2 6303 camera at part of the California Nebula. As he pointed out, without a filter you would not even see this nebula, so the results are pretty impressive considering the faint nature of what he was imaging. Click on the image to see the full size version.

M17 by Ken Crawford

This has to be one of the more unusual images of M17—the Swan Nebula—I have seen. This narrowband image in Hubble colors was taken by Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory, who put it this way: "I cannot see the swan any more." What everyone can see is that Ken has brought us a remarkable image from an object very low in the sky and mostly blocked by trees at Ken's location. He tells us that he can only see the Swan Nebula for about 90 minutes each night. This is a short time, but with his single-photon performance Trifid-2 camera and AstroDon filters it was enough for him to create something for us gape at. Click on the image to fill your screen with this unique image.

IC63 by Ken Crawford

IC63 may look like a bird flying through space, but it is actually a reflection nebula that is illuminated by a bright star—Gamma Cassiopeia—that is just off of the edge of the image. Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory brings us this image using AstroDon TruBalance filters and a Trifid-2 camera. Click on the image to see the high resolution version.

M27 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography continues to push his 12-inch Meade RCX400, Optec filters and Trifid-2 6303 camera in the bright skies near Dallas. In his latest image he shows us a little different look for M27, the Dumbbell Nebula. You can compare this against the others and decide for yourself which is your favorite. Jason's image is a combination of 100 minutes of luminance and 40 minutes each of red, green and blue. Jason is using the Meade DSI Pro for guiding, which he says it does very well. To see the enlarged version of his image click on the image to the right.

M27 by Ken Crawford

The Dumbell Nebula—M27—is one of the more photographed objects in the sky. It is bright enough to be seen by the naked eye, but this image by Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory—taken with a Trifid-2 6303 Camera and AstroDon LRGB filters—shows you all the details of the streamers and the pressure waves within the expanding shell of gas that you would not see at all except that Ken is an expert at drawing out such details. What I really like about this image is not just the beautiful teal colors in the nebula, but the wide range of star sizes and colors in the background. Comparing this image to the USNO-B1.0 star survey, there are stars fainter than 21st magnitude that you can see clearly. Click on the image to see just how deep this image really is.

M27 by Bob Fera

Bob Fera of Fera Photography sent his own fine image of M27, the Dumbell Nebula—also taken with a Trifid-2 camera and AstroDon filters—for you to compare to Ken Crawford's image of the same. It is interesting to see what two expert astro-photographers and image processors who live just a few miles away from each other can do with the same target, the same camera and the same filters. Each made choices in the framing and processing of their image that highlight or dim different aspects according to their own values. In many ways these are the same image, but down deep in the details they show rich variations. You are going to have to click on the images and see the full size versions to decide on your personal favorite. They are both fantastic images.

NGC6888 by Bob Fera

In his first appearance on our website, Bob Fera of Fera Photography takes us to the Crescent Nebula, NGC6888. Bob is an experienced CCD imager and image processor with many great images to his credit. He uses a Parallax Instruments 12.5-inch f/9 Ritchey Chretien telescope, AstroDon Ha and LRGB filters and now, a Trifid-2 6303 camera. It is easy to say "wow, what a great first image", but it is a wonderful image by any measure. Click on the image for the full size and to see why we hope to see many more images from Bob.

NGC7008 by Ken Crawford

This small and unusual but lovely planetary nebula—captured here by Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory—is not often photographed. NGC7008 or the Fetus Nebula is a planetary nebula that eons ago had a dark hole blown in it by a separate nova. The problem with photographing this nebula with a non-anti-blooming imaging chip like the KAF-6303E is that the nearby bright star wants to saturate the imaging chip immediately. Ken's solution was to image this nebula with narrow-band filters, where the star is not so bright in comparison to the nebula. His technique has once again reworded us with a wonderful image. Click on it to see the full sized version.

NGC7139 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory does not take images of many planetary nebula, but when he does, he reaches deep into the sky with his Trifid-2 camera and AstroDon filters to pick up faint nebulas that ordinary mortals such as myself have a hard time finding, let alone imaging. NGC7139 is not something you will see imaged very often, but Ken has crawled up inside of this one to show us why—with so many bright nebulas available—we should care to look at this one. The two galaxies just above the nebula indicate just how far he went to bring us this image, but you will have to click on the image to see them.

M13 by Ken Crawford

Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory took this spectacular image of M13 with his new Trifid-2 KAF-6303E camera and his 20-inch RC Optical telescope. It just goes to show how much of the sky you can image--even at F8--with a large imaging chip. Ken is not completely satisfied with the color data, but he knew that we were anxious to have some photos taken with a Trifid-2 camera, so he sent this along. You can see the luminance data by clicking here and the full sized color image by clicking on the image to the right. Ken is promising to send us lots more images in the coming days and I think you can see why that excites us.

M92 by Ken Crawford

Taking advantage of clear skies, good visibility and less than two arc-second seeing, Ken Crawford of the Rancho Del Sol Observatory is back with a beautiful image of M92. This smaller, more compact globular cluster is often passed over for M13; but M92 is a beautiful globular cluster with several distinct wandering blue stars visible. As is typical with Ken's work, you can see multiple faint galaxies in the background. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

M8 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography peered through the murk near Dallas to bring us another image; this time of M8. With his 12-inch RCX 400 and a Trifid-2 camera, he stacked 40 minutes of hydrogen alpha, 10 minutes of red, 20 minutes of green and 20 minutes of blue to bring us this detailed close up of the Lagoon Nebula. After seeing this, I am not sure you would want to go swimming in there. Click on it to see the full sized version.

M8 by Marco

Marco Lorenzi just received his Trifid-2 camera, but already he is showing just what sort of wonderful images he can create--and he is just getting warmed up! This image of the Lagoon Nebula was taken with an f/7 TEK APO 140 telescope and a Hydrogen-Alpha filter. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

Marco is an old time film photographer who is just getting started with CCD imaging. He has put together a number of images he took with his Trifid-2 camera on his website, which you need to visit to see everything he is doing. Like Jason Ware, he is combining film and CCD images to produce stunning images, such as this one of the Lagoon Nebula.

Cat's Paw Nebula by Marco

This image by Marco Lorenzi is a favorite of my daughter; but she likes everything associated with cats. This hydrogen-alpha image of the Cat's Paw Nebula, NGC6334, shows all sorts of detail and structure, but it also shows why this image needs to be taken with a wide field refractor and a large imaging chip like the KAF-6303E, as the extended object is quite large. You will have to click on the image to see the fainter nebulosity, or click here to see Marco's color combination of the same image.

M16 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography braved poor seeing and lousy transparency to bring us this 100 minute hydrogen-alpha image of M16, the Eagle Nebula. Jason takes images with a Trifid-2 6303 based camera and the all-new Meade 12-inch RCX400. He image processed this with AIP4WIN version 2 and PhotoShop. If the clouds had not rolled in he might have brought us a color image as well. But the nice thing about Astro-photography is that things do not change too quickly, so he can try again on another evening. Click on the image to see the full size version.

Rosette by Jason Ware

Here is the latest Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography Trifid luminance and color film image; this time of the Celestial Wreath. This image is a combination of two frames of 4 x 10 minutes taken from Dallas with a Trifid 6303 camera mounted on a 6-inch Meade f/9 refractor. If you click here you can see the beautiful image he created when he combined this image with 2 x 15 minutes with Fuji 100 film and a Meade Schmidt Camera taken from a dark site. Click on the image to see the full-sized luminance version.

Crab Nebula by Marco

You have probably seen many images of the crab Nebula--NGC6357--but how many time have you seen all of the wispy details visible in this one? Would you be surprised if I told you that this image was taken when the Crab was just 10 degrees above the horizon? This is just another example of how sensitive the Trifid-2 camera is in the red and hydrogen alpha wavelengths. This is an image that cameras with cover slips and interline imaging chips would need a lot more than 100 minutes to capture. Click here to see how Marco combined this image with a color film image or click on the image to see the full-sized version.

Swan Nebula by Marco

When you first look at this image of the Swan Nebula by Marco Lorenzi, it is hard to believe it was taking through a hydrogen-alpha filter, because there are so many visible stars. Ha filters allow only a few percent of the light in, so I really do not expect such a "deep" image taken with a narrowband filter. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

Crescent Nebula by Marco

What is not often seen in images of the Crescent Nebula, NGC6888, is the rich field of hydrogen it is nestled in the middle of. Marco Lorenzi shows us how much there is to appreciate in a wide field view of the area. For once we see not just the Crescent, but also the neighborhood it lives in. The hydrogen alpha in this image was taken with a Trifid-2 camera; the color combined image uses an older film image of Marco's. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

NGC6520 by Marco

When Marco Lorenzi first showed me this image of NGC6520, I thought it was an inverted image. I had never seen such a rich star field as surrounds NGC6520 and the Barnard 86 dark nebula. Checking for similar images on Google confirms that not too many people have imaged the dense star regions of the Milky Way, and no one I found in a quick search has posted a wide field image of the area. Click on the image to see the full-sized version, but you may want to turn down your monitor brightness before you do. Marco combined in an old film image of his for this amazing view.

Sword of Orion by Jason Ware

The Sword of Orion is the subject of Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography latest Trifid luminance and color film image. To create this image Jason had to build a mosaic of two different frames, each of those frames are 4 x 10 minute exposures using a Trifid 6303 camera and a 6-inch Meade f/9 refractor. You know it is a large image when it takes two six mega-pixel frames to capture it at f/9. The combined image uses color data comes from way back, taken from an old image of Jason's done with a combination of Fuji SHG 400 and Kodak PPF. Meade was impressed enough with this image to use it in their advertisements. You can tell people you know who took it and what camera he used. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

Orion M42 by Jason Ware

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography created a stunning image of M42, the Orion Nebula, by combining a film color image with a digital monochrome image from a Trifid-I 6303 camera. As a film astro-photographer for many years, he has a large library of color images to draw on.

The digital image is the combination of eight, ten minute exposures taken with an HA filter and a Meade 12-inch RCX telescope. Click on the image to see the full-sized version or click here to see Jason's color combination.

NGC-6992 by Claudine

A really beautiful image of NGC-6992 taken by Claudine Rinner with a Trifid Camera containing an Engineering grade 6303E (who knew a demo CCD could produce such great images?!) Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

M16 by Lance

M16 taken by Lance Michel. LRGB 60/30/40/40 1024X1536 (6303 binned 2X2); Camera: Yankee Robotics 6303 Class 1; Telescope: C14@f/11; Mount: Paramount ME; Guider: SBIG STV. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

Moon by Giovanni Dal Lago

Yet another photo from Giovanni Dal Lago taken of the moon with a KAF-6303E Trifid Camera and no cooling. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

The Flame by Jason

Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography latest Trifid luminance and color film image of the Flame Nebula. This image was taken in marginal seeing conditions. It is a combination of 8 x 10 minute frames taken from Dallas with a Trifid-1 6303 camera mounted on a 6-inch Meade f/9 refractor and an Ha filter, plus 2 x 60 minute frames with color film and a Meade 16-inch at f/10. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

M27 by Gordon

A 60 minute exposure of M27 through a Meade Narrow filter taken by Gordon Lupien with his 6302CE Trifid Camera at F3.3 on his LX200 GPS. Gordon median combined two darks, which he subtracted from the exposure. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

M42 by Russ

The latest color image of the Orion Nebula (M42) taken by Russ Tashbaev, from 36 miles north of Times Square in New York City. Russ uses a Trifid 6302 camera and an Optec IFW filter wheel at the prime focus of a TMB-175 APO telescope. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.

Moon by Jason Ware

An image of the moon taken by Jason Ware of Galaxy Photography with a new 12-inch Meade RCX telescope and a Trifid-1 KAF-6303E camera. Click on the image to see the full-sized version.