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Here is a combination of the most recent images along with our all-time favorite images taken with Trifid cameras. Be sure to also look at the "Additional Images" link. We are continually updating this list and would like to include your images too.


IC1848 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Let me guess. If you are a regular visitor to our website, as soon as you saw the thumbnail of this image you said to yourself, "That is a Bob Fera image." If so, you are correct. Bob's images have a characteristic look which is their high quality, fine attention to detail and strong character without ever looking over-processed. What you may not know is that while IC 1848 is often called the Baby Nebula, Bob's wife Janice says it looks more like a pig. You are going to have to click on the image to the right and make your own decision in this matter.

NGC660 by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

What is the secret to the unusual galaxy NGC660? I have heard it described as a barrel galaxy, as a polar ring galaxy and as two colliding galaxy. Whatever the truth of it is, it made a rich target for Ken Crawford, his AstroDon filters and Trifid-2 6303E camera. You are really going to be impressed with all of the fine details Ken captured if you click on the image to the right.

IC1396 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

There are certain images that are composed, detailed and processed in such a way as to make them pop into your eye. This image of IC 1386, an Emission Nebula in Cepheus, by Bob Fera, is just such an image. It is incredible how much detail Bob has packed into this image. There are all sorts of features that are worthy of study all by themselves. Such as the dark and bright area studied by Ken Crawford in his image that I call "The Green Goblin", which you will see just to the right of center. Click on the image to the right to discover all of the many fine details available in this image.

M33 by Jason Ware with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

I think this is arguably the finest image Jason Ware has taken with a Trifid-2 camera; and he has taken lots of images with that camera. What is special about this image of the Pinwheel Galaxy is the bright regions of hydrogen-alpha that Jason shows in stark contrast to the white and blue surrounding galaxy. There are people out there who thought the RCX-400 was not capable of taking such a fine image. Jason shows just how wrong they are. Click on the image to the right to see what a fine job he did.

Double Clushter by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

I had never seen this double cluster in Cassiopeia before. But instead of having to spend nights squinting through an eyepiece trying to catch a glimpse of it, Bob Fera has delivered it anyone who has a computer and an Internet connection. And deliver it in fine style he has! Given that there is only 120 minutes of data here, there is a surprising amount of color. If you really want to enjoy the rich red stars that lay up against the bright blues, you will have to click on the image to the right.

NGC7771 by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Ken Crawford calls this just "a couple of interesting galaxies." He is right, it is a couple of interesting galaxies—surrounded by tens of smaller, fainter, galaxies. How many can you count? I do not know what is interacting with what, but there is a lot of activity in the small slice of the sky. You are going to have to click on the image to the right to see all of the faint fuzzies in their full glory.

NGC281 by Jason Ware with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Jason Ware took this image of the Pelican Nebula using a Meade 12-inch RCX-400, AstroDon narrowband filters and a Trifid-2 6303E camera. If you go to our Even More Astro-Photos page, you will see the same image taken by Ken Crawford. It is interesting to see how much difference there can be when different astro-photographers take images of the same object. Click on the image to the right to see the full sized image.

IC1805 Center by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

What appears to be a scene from X-men, where aliens are just coming out of hyper-space, is really a Ken Crawford image of another area of IC1805, taken with AstroDon narrowband filters and a Trifid-2 camera.

Ken pulled out all of the stops on this image and was rewarded with an Astronomy, Picture of the Day award. Way to go, Ken! Click on the image to the right to find all of the reasons this image is worth gaping at.

M31 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

There are many images on the Internet of M31, but I think it comes to no one's surprise that if one of them takes your breath away, you find it was captured and processed by Bob Fera. Bob has a touch with with his processing that few can imitate.

I think this image looks like a Death Star chasing a renegade fighter, just about the time you realize that means the Death Star is headed towards you. M31 is a close—and hopefully friendly—neighbor of ours. Click on the image to the right and see what signs of battle you can find.

IC1805 Everest by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Ken Crawford calls this image "the Everest of Nebulae", which is a high-resolution image using AstroDon narrowband filters of one part of IC1805, the Heart Nebula. I really like this image, which looks like a fire racing across the plains to burn up Mount Everest, which is already glowing deep red. It is hard to know what to say about the detail and the depth that Ken captured in this image, except to say that I am really glad he did it with a Trifid-2 6303-based camera! Click on the image to the right to see everything this image has to offer.

M13 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

You have probably seen many great images of the globular cluster M13, but I wonder if you have ever seen one with such rich colors as this one Bob Fera took? I look at the blues and the yellows of the cluster and the orange and the blue stars in the foreground that frame this image and I see all sorts of colors I have not noticed before. Click on the image to the right to see what a great image with excellent composition that Bob has put together.

Abell 2666 by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Ken Crawford may have pushed this image of the Abell 2666 cluster hard, but there is a lot of detail he wants to show. As with his other images of Abell clusters, you can spend a long time finding all of the faint galaxies in this image. Ken says his favorite is the small galaxy to the lower right that has a tidal tail. You will have a hard time finding an image that shows as much of that tail as Ken is able to show. Click on the image to the right and feast on all of the many details this image contains.

The North American and Pelican Nebulas by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Though Bob Fera just calls this a test image, I think he has done a nice job with the North American and Pelican Nebulas. What Bob was testing was a Stellarvue SV4 refractor telescope with a Televue 0.8x reducer/flattener and a Trifid-2 camera. The image may not be his best, but it is well worth looking at in full resolution by clicking on the image to the right.

M8 by Jason Ware with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Using his 12-inch, Meade RCX-400 telescope, AstroDon narrowband filters and a Trifid-2 camera, Jason Ware put together this image, which he calls the Blue Lagoon. Since M8 is known as the Lagoon Nebula, that makes a lot of sense. Click on the image to the right to see what sort of creatures hide in this lagoon.

The Bubble Nebula by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

The Bubble Nebula is a well photographed object—and for good reason. When an irresistible force meets an immovable object, the fireworks can be seen from light-years away. Here a massive star pounds the surrounding clouds of molecular gas with hot radiation, creating a bright blue oasis. Ken Crawford photographed the Bubble through AstroDon e-line or narrowband filters with his Trifid-2 6303-based camera. His image makes the surrounding dust look like it is on fire, which is appropriate to a battleground. Click on the image to the right to see it in full size where you can really appreciate the majesty of this image.

M51 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Some images you can look at and immediately guess who probably made them. Images created by Bob Fera have a certain look and feel that says "master craftsman" all over them. This image of M51 is perfect example of why everyone wow's images made by Bob. He went through five major revisions of this image—that I know about—before he got it to his liking. I do not know if Bob has any understudies, but if so, they are learning a fine art from a master. Click on the image to see just what a masterpiece this image is.

M16 by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

When I first saw this image of M16, I thought that Ken Crawford had sent me a copy of the Hubble image of the same. Especially at high resolution, look at all of the details; look at all of the colors; Wow! But this is not a Hubble image; earthbound Ken pushed his Trifid-2 6303-based camera and his AstroDon filters where no (earthbound) man has gone before. The Oxygen-III data came from Mr. AstroDon himself--Don Goldman--using an SBIG STL-11000 camera from his dark sight in New Mexico.

I have only shown the Pillars of Creation in the snapshot to the right. Click on that snapshot to see the full-size image and to feel the full 3D effect this image creates. This is one of those images that the more you zoom in the better it gets, but you are going to need a big monitor to really enjoy it.

NGC-6914 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Most of the images Bob Fera takes with his Trifid-2 6303-based camera can be taken in a night to a night and a half. When Bob spends four nights on the same object, you know he is working with a faint object. Since NGC-6914 is both an Emission Nebula and a Reflection Nebula, you know it is going to be difficult to see everything because the Emission areas will be bright and the Reflection areas will be dim—and in this image you have them side by side. It takes a master to make a photo like Bob has here, but it does not take a master to appreciate it. Click on the image to the right to see what I mean. Then if you have the time, browse some of the other images of NGC-6914 on the web. You will be hard pressed to find anyone else who has pulled out so much dim detail. We are very proud that he could do so much with one of our cameras.

APR188 The Tadpole by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

When Ken Crawford goes to work, everyone I know stands back and is amazed. This is the finest ground-based image of the Tadpole I have seen. If you know of a better one, please let me know, because the only one I have seen that is close is the Hubble image of the same. I do not know how deep Ken went with his Trifid-2 6303-based camera, but you can find objects in this image that just do not show up anywhere else. Could Ken have created this image if it weren't for the AstroDon filters he uses? I am not sure, but if you want to click on his link and e-mail him, I am sure he will tell you what he thinks: Ken is a really nice guy who is always willing to help out. Click on the image to the right and be sure to expand the image if your browser wants to shrink it.

Rosette by Greg Beeke with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

In his first appearance on our website, Greg Beeke shows us a dynamite view of the Rosette Nebula. Greg just purchased a Trifid-2 6303-based camera, which he is using with great success on his TMB 100/800 with a 0.8 focal reducer. He tells me that he used short 60 second exposures because he hasn't got his guiding sorted out yet. If you click on the image you will see a streak about about one o'clock, which he tells me is the Asteroid 2004 LK1. I think you will agree, we hope to see a lot more of Greg on our website.

IC410 by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

After viewing this image from Ken Crawford, Brian Lula said, "it is remarkable to see the structure in this particular emission region." What is not recorded is whether Brian had his sunglasses on at the time or not. Even though readers of this website know Ken Crawford quite well by now, he continues to stun us with what he is able to do with AstroDon narrowband Ha, S-III and O-II filters and his Trifid-2 6303 camera.

This image was featured in NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day—APOD—which was a real honor for Yankee Robotics and Ken Crawford. Way to go, Ken!

M45 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Even Bob Fera now has to admit that this target was a bit crazy to take on with a non-anti-blooming camera and a refractor. The Pleiades—or Seven Sisters—in Taurus is so bright that most astronomers will shy away from it. Even if you were to attack with extra short exposures you would only lose all of the beautiful, faint, wispy details. But Bob has worked miracles again using AstroDon LRGB filters, a Trifid-2 6303-based camera and a lot of image processing, he has shown us what normal mortals dare not attempt. Click on the image to the right to see just how miraculous his results are.

NGC1275 by Ken Crawford with a Trifid-2 KAF-6302LEE cooled CCD Camera

Using a prototype Trifid-2 camera with an anti-blooming (ABG) KAF-6302LE imaging chip, Ken Crawford peered into the Perseus A galaxy cluster. About this image Ken says: "I centered on NGC1275 to see if I could get any detail of the red filaments radiating from the center area. It is suggested that a spiral galaxy is passing though the center of this galaxy at very high speed. I just started to capture the red filaments and the dust lane from the spiral arm of the passing galaxy." You will have to click on the image to the right to see those details or click on this link to see just the Hydrogen-alpha image he took.

This image was featured in NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day—APOD—which was a real honor for Yankee Robotics and Ken Crawford. Way to go, Ken!

M16 by Claudine Rinner with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

In her first appearance on our website, Claudine Rinner, shows us what she can do with a Trifid-2 6303 camera at prime focus on her f/3 Valmeca T400 telescope. Claudine spends most of her time doing scientific research with her telescope and camera, but we are happy she took time out to bring us this pretty picture of M16, which is 30, two minute exposures of Oxygen III and 30, two minute exposures of Sulfur II. If you search for Claudine Rinner on Google, you will find many hits that show she hunts asteroids, makes photometry measurements of supernova and astrometry measurements of comets and asteroids. What Google will not tell you yet is that last week—the second week of August, 2005—Claudine discovered five new asteroids with her Trifid-2 camera. I think that makes her our first lady of science. Click on the image of M16 to the right to see the high resolution image.

M20 by Bob Fera with a Trifid-2 KAF-6303E cooled CCD Camera

Bob Fera and his 12.5-inch Parallax telescope are back again with an image we may have to use elsewhere, because it is our namesake: M20, the Trifid Nebula (do you say Try-fid or Trif-fid?). Not only has Bob captured outer faint nebulosity that extends right off the page, you can see some of the details the Hubble Space Telescope captured in its famous image of the same nebula. But to see that sort of detail you are going to have to click on the image for the full size version.